Independent & Regency Romances Page 1 - Claudy Conn

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Independent & Regency Romances Page 1


 


It started with a stolen kiss ...
Fiery Myriah Whitney is wild of nature, contrary, and independent. But when her father catches her kissing the handsome Sir Roland (how else is she to determine if he is the one who will make her feel thunder and lightning, hear bells and music?), he declares that her days of headstrong independence are over. She will, he commands, announce her engagement to Sir Roland--immediately.

One goal consumes Chazma Donnelly: find the dark sorcerer who murdered her parents. When the trail leads her to Ireland, she takes a job cataloging a private library. But she doesn't expect to find a manor house that eerily echoes one in her dreams, or an employer whose touch awakens a savage darkness within her. The attraction between Chazma and Lord Jethro McBain is volatile, but darkness surrounds his aura. Chazma doesn't trust him, even though it is his voice she hears in her sleep, and his touch that sizzles the blood in her veins. As Chazma's investigation widens, a series of local murders shows the killer knows of her obsession. Will Chazma's need for revenge take her from the edge of evil into a black pit where she can no longer find herself? Or can she find love in the midst of darkness?

 


Cherry Elton was beside herself! Her own mother had arranged a marriage for her to a man she had never even met. She had no choice but to run away.

Sky Westbrooke had no wish to marry, but his mischievous siblings sorely needed a firm maternal hand. Yet, how could he court his unseen bride, when into his employ had come the most remarkable, enchanting governess?

 


The Marquis of Lyndhurst is tired of women who are more attracted to his title and money than to his charms. So when his mother requests that he go to the Isle of Wight to court another eligible woman, Ryker decides on a little game … his cousin Robby will pose as him, and he will pose as his cousin—a rake and a gambler. If the woman falls in love with him, it will be for himself. Only then will he reveal who he is.

What the marquis doesn’t expect, however, is someone like Jewelene. Lovely and provocative, intelligent and headstrong, Jewels cares not for status and wealth. Ryker finds her irresistible, and she finds herself falling for the handsome man she believes to be the marquis’ cousin.

But Jewelene is playing a game of her own. In a daring bid to repay her family’s debts, each night she poses as Babette, the French card dealer. When Ryker begins flirting with the sultry Babette, Jewelene realizes she has become her own rival. If she reveals the truth, will her house of cards come tumbling down?

 


Lord Thurston Tarrant, known as Hotspur on the London social scene, thinks Lady Taffeta Grantham is too young and idealistic. Experience has taught him that love is found only in fairy tales and that very few women can be trusted—especially young and attractive ones.

As for Taffy, she finds the rakehell cynical and arrogant—definitely not the hero, the man of principles and romance, her heart longs for. Besides, as one of the Rogues Three, she is more concerned with social injustice than a man who could use his influence to right wrongs but shows no interest in doing so.

So why does Tarrant find himself enchanted by the beautiful and high-spirited Taffy? Why does Taffy’s sporadic gift of sight insist on showing her visions of Tarrant as a bold and passionate lover—her lover?

When the prince of flirts catches the princess of thieves in a ‘Robin Hood’ encounter gone wrong, a secret is discovered, a promise is given, and two lives will be changed in ways neither could have dreamed. 

 


Lady Babs had already done one unforgivable thing: she had written a novel. It was under a pseudonym, of course, but the story she’d thought would sell only a few copies to help stave off her father’s creditors was becoming a sensation. Passion’s Seed had the beau monde in a panic, because it was all about ‘them’! If it were ever revealed that she, one of the aristocracy’s own, was the author, she would be ruined.

Now she was contemplating doing something equally scandalous. The ‘rules’ dictated that, as a woman, she had to wait until marriage to enjoy pleasures men were allowed when single. Lady Babs, however, had other ideas, for she had fallen in love with the man known as Lord Wildfire, a dashing duke with a penchant for the ladies but not for marriage.

But while she yearned for Lord Wildfire, another man lusted after her. And Sir Edward was willing to go to any lengths to make her his—including following his hunch that Lady Babs was somehow involved in the publication of Passion’s Seed …

 


Sassy found herself in trouble after her father the vicar�s death�more than the usual kind. She has turned twenty-one and is going through transition as her powers of light magic are completed.

Not quite penniless but no longer able to stay in her home, as a new vicar would arrive to take over the parsonage, she has to find a respectable position.

 


No matter what her family and friends say, Jenny knows she will never fall in love again. How can she, when her childhood sweetheart was one of the countless killed at Waterloo?

So when the Earl of Danfield proposes a marriage of convenience, it seems the perfect solution. He will secure his inheritance, and she will be spared the necessity of being paraded in society, forced to dance and flirt and do all the things her broken heart cannot do. His proposal will give her what she wants most. Peace.

But peace is the last thing she finds in her marriage. Her growing attraction to the earl brings with it guilt that she’s betraying her beloved Johnny. Her mother-in-law considers her an interloper. Her husband’s former lover makes it clear she doesn’t want it to be former. And when a supposed prank nearly kills her, Jenny has to wonder—now that the earl’s inheritance is assured, has she become an inconvenience to be eliminated?

There is darkness in light, there is pain in joy, and there are thorns on the rose.”
by Cate Tiernan

Exerilla is a white witch.
Her father is a dark and dangerous warlock with an agenda to marry her to someone she despises. He has the power to do this before she reaches her majority, which will occur at Samhain, Halloween.
Her mother has a plan and against her daughter’s will, implements that plan, which sends Exerilla into the past, where she must remain until October 31st—months away. And magic is something she can’t use because her father could trace it to her.
Here is the problem, plans have a way of seeping from black and white into gray.

 


Bess Saunders has fallen in love. He is big, he is charmingly masculine, and his Scottish accent sends her reeling with very unmaiden-like desires.
Having inherited his mother’s English home and title, Earl of Dunkirk of Scotland is considered a prize catch by the haute ton. He knows one day he will have to marry to carry on his name, but he wants a wife who ‘understands’ they will each go their own way after she gives him an heir—a marriage of convenience.
Lady Bess does not fit into those plans. How could she? She is exquisite, yes, but she is also an innocent who expects faithfulness. He won’t ruin an innocent, and yet, he can’t get her out of his head.
All this time, and right in their midst, evil hovers. Although Bess doesn’t look for it, she finds it—and Bess is not your average, simpering female. She takes on danger and mayhem like she does everything else: full throttle.
Adventure ensues as we travel with Bess through romance and the battle of her life.
 
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